A whole new way of approaching the art and science of keeping instruments in tune and intonated

A whole new way of approaching the art and science of keeping instruments in tune and intonated


FOR INSTALLERS

Become an Installer

To become an installer listed on our website one must first do one install of any of our bridges.

The resources needed for installation we keep on this page. Here can be found the dimensioned diagrams of the bridge and the route pocket in the guitar, as well as written installation instructions. The files are in PDF, DXF, and STP format. Video routing and installation videos can be found here. [Please note, the G model installation video shows some dated tools that are no longer used. There is a note on the screen at these points to refer to the written instructions. The written instructions will always be the most up to date.]

To make the required route pocket in the guitar an installer can use a CNC machine or a handheld router with templates. Using our diagrams, an installer could make his/her own templates however we recommend buying the templates from us here. Our templates include all materials necessary to complete the route and they match our written instructions.

Expect a first time routing by hand to take 4 – 6 hours. Average price of an installation has ranged from $250 - $350 for the F & T installs and $300 - $500 for the G installs. A lot depends on the specifics of each install (was there a former trem pocket that needs to be filled, will the guitar need a recessed backplate because it is too thin). And ultimately pricing is up to the installer.

To be listed as an installer on our website, we need to know that the installer:

  1. does clean routing for the route pocket
  2. understands what makes a good installation in terms of the EverTune functionality
  3. understands the setup and function of the bridge

Show us a clean install:

To show us that the route is clean, please take before routing and after routing (without bridge installed to show the route pocket) pics of the front and back of the guitar and send them to cosmos@evertune.com.


Show us correct functionality of the EverTune after install:

Correct functionality of the EverTune means that:

  1. each saddle holds contant tension in the range we call Zone 2.
  2. each saddle has full range of motion for string height (action) and string length (intonation) adjustment.
  3. the route pocket was placed in the right place so that the guitar can intonate properly.

Thus, to show us a good installation we ask for 3 videos: Please upload these videos to YouTube or similar video hosting service.

The first video will show that each saddle holds constant tension. An example video is shown below.

And here is a written description of what the video should show:

The installer starts in Zone 2, then using the tuning pegs at the head stock drops down to Zone 1, then goes one turn back into Zone 2 and checks the tuning on a tuner. Then the installer goes all the way through Zone 2 to Zone 3. Then goes one turn back down to Zone 2 and checks the tuning on a tuner. The tuning at the point one turn from Zone 1 should be within 10 cents of the tuning at the point one turn from Zone 3
  • In our example video we show only one saddle. The video the installer submits to us should show this test for all saddles.
  • If the tuning varies by more than 10 cents on just ONE saddle, then it might be a defective saddle, which is rare, but it happens, and it should be replaced.
  • If the tuning varies by more than 10 cents on ALL the saddles it means that the installation needs to be adjusted.
  • If the note in Zone 2 close to Zone 1 is more than 10 cents lower than the note in Zone 2 close to Zone 3, then the front (closest to the nut) bottom section of the bridge needs to be mounted deaper into the guitar. This section rests on the footplate part, which is the stamped sheet metal part shown in the picture below.
  • This footplate would have to be routed deeper into the guitar to correct the tuning when the note close to Zone 1 is lower than the note close to Zone 2. 1/8 inch (3mm) deeper equates to about 15-20 cents adjustment.
  • If the note close to Zone 1 is more than 10 cents higher than the note close to Zone 3, then the footplate would have to be mounted less deep in the guitar to correct this issue. In this case, if the route is already too deep, the installer would have to use washers or a washer plate to move the footplate out of the route a bit. 1/8 inch (3mm) deeper equates to about 15-20 cents adjustment.

The second video shows that the saddles have full range of motion vertically and horizontally. An example video is shown below:

And here is a written description of what the video should show:

The installer starts with the saddle in the farthest forward position and the highest up positon.

In the video we tap the front of the saddle to show that there is almost no gap between the saddle and the front of the faceplate. This is the farthest forward position. Then we try to stick a piece of folded paper between the back top of the saddle and the bottom of the faceplate to show that the saddle is in the highest up position.

Then the installer drops the height of the saddle until the string rests or buzzes on the frets. This shows that the saddle can reach the lowest forward point.

Then the installer raises the saddle back to the highest position and pulls the saddle to the farthest back position. This shows that the saddle can reach the highest back position.

Then the installer lowers the saddle to the lowest position. This shows that the saddle can reach the lowest back position.

So essentially the video shows that each saddle has a full range of motion by showing that it can move to the four extreme points: front/top, front/bottom, back/bottom, back/top.

This should be done for each saddle. It is very important to a correct install because it will show if anything in the routing or wiring or pickups is in the way of the saddles range of motion.

If the action is unable to be raised so that the back of the saddle almost touches the bottom of the faceplate as in the video, and especially if this happens in the front most positions, it is probably because something is blocking the saddle from rising underneath. This can be wood from the routing that should be removed, wires, or even the bottom of thick pickups. Whatever is holding the saddle from rising, must be identified and corrected, before it can be considered a good EverTune install.

Likewise with intonation, if the saddle is unable to go to the far front position, something is blocking. The blockage must be identified and corrected before it is considered a good EverTune install.

The third installation video shows that the guitar is intonated correctly on every string. This will show that the bridge was placed in the right place relative to the scale length. This is very important because if the bridge is routed too far forward or backward it is almost impossible to correct this error and then the guitar will never intonate correctly.


Show us an understanding of bridge setup:

To show us an understanding of bridge set up we ask for one last video.

Start with the B string tuned and intonated and set to bend. Then tune it down to an A and set it up so that it is again tuned and intonated and set to bend.